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Ford Tractor Before and After

Ford Tractor Before and After

Ford 8N – Before

I bought this Ford tractor for $800 in the Fall of 2015. It came with tire chains, a PTO belt pully, a rear blade and a 3 point boom, what a deal. It ran but needed restoring, just got done on October 8th, Saturday morning at 8:30 am. I drove it in a parade at noon that day and got 1st place.

Rod Luckasson
Ferryville, Wisconsin

Ford 8N – After

 

Another project below. This little pulling tractor has a 9″ Ford rear end, they use them in stock cars as they are darn near indestructible. Skid steer tires in the back, donut tires in the front and best of all it is garnished with a 1963 195 cid Pontiac slant four engine. This little one looks like a chopped 8N Ford.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Marriage of Two Rescued Tractors

The Marriage of Two Rescued Tractors

The story of my tractor, a 1972 Ford 4110 is actually the end result of a “Tractor Marriage” between two tractors, the 1972 Ford 4110 that sat outside for 6+ years and a 1963 International B414 that sat outside for 10+ years. They were both basically “given up on” abandoned and doomed for the scrap pile. The attached link to my YouTube video slide show tells it all better than I can with words. Thanks for Watching, “Book ’em DanO’

Dan O-Connor
Wallkill, New York

Father and Son Restoration of Oliver Row Crop

Father and Son Restoration of Oliver Row Crop

This is my newly restored 1951 Oliver Row Crop 77. The Oliver 77 was the first tractor my Dad and I each drove as kids on the farm. So naturally we restored this one together. We did it over the summer of 2016. I learned so much from my Dad during the restoration. He’s had Olivers & Whites his whole life and is a walking encyclopedia of them. A few of the highlights of this 77 are power steering, dual hydraulics, and we custom fit flat top fenders from a 1650 to the 77 to add our own touch. We recently purchased an Oliver 770 to restore together, and can’t wait to get started. Father/son time doesn’t get any better!

Dathan Hiemstra
Beaver Dam, Wisconsin

Pictures of the restoration process.

Tips for Wiring Your Tractor

Tips for Wiring Your Tractor

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I just finished up a massive re-wiring project on this New Holland tractor. Mice had burrowed their way under the hood and gnawed at the wires. What a mess! Along the way to fixing this tractor up, I learned a lot about wiring problems from my Dad (in addition to being a great mechanic, he’s also a licensed electrician. Winning combo!). Here are some of our best tips for tractor electrical work:

1. When you’re installing a new harness, no need to start from scratch: firmly tape the new wires to the old wires, and pull through the loom. Voila! No need to thread individual wires through tight spots.
2. Some harnesses come with additional wire that you might not use. That’s okay – but be sure to seal off unused wires properly. Cut the wire flush, then put same tape or a wire nut over the end.
3. In the same way that you wouldn’t change the oil in your car without also replacing the filter, you should change your battery cables when you replace the harness. Battery cables need to be clean and in good condition.

4. If the wires are stiff, try putting a little bit of dish soap on the wires to help them slide through easier.

There you have it! These are my best tips for tractor electrical work. How about you – do you know any (safe!) shortcuts or tricks to make these difficult jobs go a little easier? If so, share in the comments below.

My Friend’s 8N

My Friend’s 8N

matthew-craigMy friend’s father bought my 8N when it was new – he was the original owner. He farmed with it on his family’s homestead in Missouri for many years until he bought a new tractor. My friend moved away but returned later in life and began farming and blacksmithing on the homestead. He brought that 8N back to life and used it for several years until he was too sick to use it. He offered it to me as he knew I wanted to begin a small farm. He had also seen several of my restoration projects so he knew I would take good care of it. I’m not sure where it will go from here but it will be well cared for.

Matthew Craig
Athens, Ohio

This Oliver is Back on her Wheels

This Oliver is Back on her Wheels

roger-fast-beforeThis is our 1954 Oliver 77 row crop. We pulled it out of the shed with hardly any usable rubber to pull it two miles home. We spent about two months getting it to run right.

This summer we started on restoring the sheet metal roger-fast-afterand eventually getting to the cast iron. We are missing the front panels hoping on finding two good ones plus a not so rusty rim. We are hoping on getting everything looking new again.

Roger Fast
Butterfield, Minnesota

5 Things Your Shop Needs

5 Things Your Shop Needs

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In addition to regular shop tools, tractor mechanics need a few large pieces of equipment. I benefit from a huge, well-equipped shop (thanks, Dad!), but you don’t need to have all the bells and whistles to begin working on tractors. Here are what I consider to be the 5 can’t-live-without essentials to a well equipped shop.

  1. Cherry picker. This is especially important if you’re working alone – but even with friends to help, a cherry picker will make a big difference in your ability to safely move heavy tractor components around the shop.
  2. Floor jack. Good floor jacks are really important – we have 3! This isn’t something to economize on, either. Get the highest quality you can find, with a weight limit that far exceeds the sort of work you’re planning to do.
  3. Welder. Every shop should have one! While welders used to be huge and expensive, these days small, affordable buzz boxes are easy to come by.
  4. Torch. A basic torch makes so many shop jobs possible. My dad and I even have 2 tanks of oxygen (one in use, one full and ready for when we run out). If you’re just getting started and have to choose between a torch and a welder, get a torch and learn how to gas weld. While gas welding isn’t as strong as a real weld, you can do fairly well. 
  5. Manuals for your tractor. I’ve written about the importance of a good shop manual before, but it’s worth repeating: every mechanic needs to have a manual!

How about you – what would you add to this list?

Central Washington Agricultural Museum Restoration

Central Washington Agricultural Museum Restoration

Massey Harris Parade Photo

Volunteers at the Central Washington Ag Museum recently completed a restoration of Massey Harris Pony tractor that was originally made in 1950. The Massey Harris Pony was the smallest of the tractors manufactured by Massey Harris and was manufactured from 1947-1957 and was designed for use by small farmers. It has a three speed transmission (unsynchronized) and can develop 10.4 horsepower at the drawbar. It has a 4 cylinder Continental engine.

The tractor was owned by the Libby, McNeil and Libby Canning Plant located in Toppenish, WA and was used by them from the 1950’s until the 1970’s primarily to run test plantings of various corn varieties on a test plot in Toppenish. Over that 30 year span, common attachments for the Pony were a disc, spring tooth harrow and cultivator. In addition to corn, Libby, McNeil and Libby also had test plots of sweet peas, spinach, green beans and carrots.

Libby, McNeil and Libby went out of business in the early 1980’s and one of Libby’s field men, Robert Gallion acquired the tractor at this time. Mr. Gallion’s son, Rob Gallion used the disc and harrow for several years on his family’s property until it was donated to the Central Washington Ag Museum in 1992.

Rob had seen the Pony several times at the annual Pioneer Power Show, held the third weekend of August at the Ag Museum.  He noticed the front tires seemed to be deteriorating over the years.  He decided he wanted to get new front tires and help restore this Massey Harris Pony.

Rob did purchase new front tires. Then the work really began. Rob helped our Volunteer Crew completely dismantle the Pony. They did a major overhaul of the carburetor and the distributor, cleaned the accumulated dirt and grease, painted the entire tractor the original colors, and added new side panels and decals.

Rob himself proudly drove the restored tractor during the 2016 Old Town Days Parade in Union Gap, WA in late June. The tractor will also be displayed and be part of the equipment parade during the Pioneer Power Show held from August 20-21 at Union Gap’s Fullbright Park and the Central Washington Agricultural Museum.

“Driving that Massey Harris down Main Street, Union Gap in the parade was certainly a highlight for me. It brought back great memories of my father and the work he did for his career. Restoring this tractor has been very fulfilling and I want to thank the Central Washington Ag Museum’s volunteers for helping to make this happen,” said Rob Gallion.

The Central Washington Ag Museum currently has 148 tractors on site representing many of the leading manufacturers of their respective time. Several of the tractors are fully operational, although numerous tractors are in the need of repairs. If you have an interest in helping restore any of these tractors, or have a family story and history to lend to a tractor, please contact the Central Washington Ag Museum at www.centralwaagmuseum.org or call them at 509-457-8735.

The Central Washington Ag Museum is located at 4508 Main St, Union Gap, WA 98903

Eric Patrick

Q&A with Rachel & Dan

Q&A with Rachel & Dan

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This Thursday at 1:00pm EST you will get the chance to ask Rachel Gingell and her dad, Dan Gingell your tractor repair questions. Meet Rachel, and the man behind the camera, her dad, who has taught his daughter so much about tractors and their maintenance.

Since time will be limited they will be answering questions about International / Farmall tractor brands only this week. If all goes well we will continue this series with other brands in the future.

Join us this Thursday August 25th LIVE on Steiner Tractor Parts FB page at 1:00 with your repair questions on your IH/Farmall tractor. Can’t make it at 1:00, no worries we will post the video online for you to watch at a time convenient for you.

John Deere 2010 Review

John Deere 2010 Review

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The John Deere New Generation line (beginning with the 2010 and its sister models) was truly revolutionary. It represented the first modern, four-cylinder tractors the John Deere company had ever manufactured. Many tractors in this line turned out to be incredibly reliable and are still in use today – most notably, the 4020 John Deere. However, a few losses came alongside the victory. In my opinion, the 2010 is a tractor to steer clear of.

The 2010 was a huge advance for its time. The Deere company tried out lots of new strategies with the New Generation line, and the 2010 included a new engine design. The engine had an inventive deck plate to hold the sleeves in. The deck plate rested directly on top of the sleeves, using some O rings to make a seal.

This is another one of those ideas that sounds great on paper but doesn’t work as well in the field. As the tractor is used during the day – especially if it is turned off and on frequently – the engine naturally expands and contracts. The all-in-one design of the deck plate makes this tiny amount of expansion and contraction a big problem. The O rings aren’t enough to maintain a seal.

In addition to the engine difficulties, the model is also susceptible to a wide variety of PTO problems.

John Deere abandoned the deck plate idea when this model’s production was through. After the 2010, no additional models were made with deck plates. This is great news for the reliability of other tractors in the New Generation line, but it’s bad news for owners of these tractors. A low demand for parts means that parts are difficult to find and expensive.

The 2010 was a huge advance for the time. Nostalgia is strong with these tractors, too. For many farmers, the 2010 was the first modern tractor they owned. The live power, live hydraulics, and ergonomic design were game-changers for the industry. Restoring one can be a real labor of love – just know what you are getting into!